How High Should A Wall Mount Faucet Be From The Sink?

With the increasing popularity of vessel sinks, wall mount faucets have been showing up in more and more bathroom remodels. As an alternative to the single hole, more common vessel sink faucet, wall mount faucets are not mounted on the wall behind the sink. Though they can be used for undermount sinks, they rarely are because the distance between the spout and the bottom of the sink is too great.

So, when considering a vessel sink with a wall mount faucet, it’s important to plan the placement of the faucet so that you avoid the “splash factor” that commonly occurs with vessel sinks. So, to help with this, we asked our resident Contractor about the standard height it should be above the sink. He says that the faucet should mounted 4″-6″ from the bottom of the spout to the bottom of the sink.

Acrylic Countertop Repair

Acrylic countertops, commonly called solid surface, have colors and designs that run all the way through the material. This makes it possible to repair most damage, including stains, scratches and burns. Although you need professional service for very deep scratches and burns, or to restore high-gloss counter finishes, you can repair less serious damage to matte and semi-gloss surfaces yourself.

Stains

Acrylic counters are nonporous, but they can stain. Common stains include ink, food, shoe polish, cosmetics and superficial cigarette burns. Remove these stains by cleaning the counter with an abrasive cleaner and the appropriate cleaning pad for your counter’s finish. Use a heavy-duty scouring pad for a matte-finish counter, or a non-scratching scouring pad for a counter with a semi-gloss finish. Alternatively, use the cleaning pad recommended by your counter’s manufacturer.

Light Scratches

You can remove light scratches on a matte- or semi-gloss counter using an abrasive cleaner and a sponge or damp cloth. Scrub gently, in a circular motion, until the scratches disappear. Use a non-scratching scouring pad to work in the cleaner if the sponge doesn’t remove the scratches.

Deeper Scratches and Cuts

Deeper scratches and cuts might require sanding. Your counter’s manufacturer may sell a scratch-removal kit with sanding pads or sandpaper, but you can achieve the same results using your own materials. Use a random orbital sander and 120-grit sandpaper. Sand the counter a second time using 180-grit paper, then use 220-grit sandpaper until the damage is gone and the counter surface is smooth. Buff out sanding marks on a matte-finish counter using a heavy-duty scouring pad. For semi-gloss counters, use 320-grit, then 400-grit, sandpaper, then buff with an ultra-fine scouring pad.

Restoring a Damaged Finish

Sanding can restore your counter’s matte or semi-gloss finish. Begin work on a matte finish counter with 220-grit sandpaper, then buff the surface vigorously using a heavy-duty scouring pad in a circular motion. For a semi-gloss counter, start with 220 sandpaper and work your way up to 400. Buff the surface with an abrasive cleaner and a sponge to blend any marks. Glossy counters need professional restoration.

How to Hang a Wall Mirror

Adding wall mirrors to your decor will provide an updated, attractive look to any empty wall. They can brighten rooms, and even make small rooms appear larger. Wall mirrors come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, so it is important to carefully consider the area where you plan to hang them before making your purchase. In addition, because of the delicate nature of the glass and the need to adequately prepare the space where you will be hanging wall mirrors, you must be sure you have all the proper tools prior to beginning the task.

Method 1 – Hanging the Mirror With Hooks

1. Determine what type of wall you have. There are a variety of different wall types, including drywall, plaster, and masonry. A particularly heavy mirror will need a stronger backing like masonry to stay in place. The wall’s material will also determine how big your screws and anchors need to be.

2. Weigh your mirror. Make sure you have a good idea of what your mirror weighs, which will help you get the right size hooks. Hanging hooks have a weight limit on them, and if you go over it, your mirror will fall off the wall, break, and probably damage your wall in the process. A bathroom scale should be enough to get a good weight.

3. Find a place to hang the mirror. Make sure you have enough space on the wall for the mirror, and otherwise decide how you want it positioned relative to other items on the wall and in the room. Hold your mirror up to the wall to see how much space it will take up. Finding a stud can be useful, but not necessary if you have a strong enough hanger.

. Once you have a good place, mark where the top of your mirror will go with a pencil or some painters tape so you’ll be able to measure for the hangers. You can also use those pencil marks and a level to make sure your mirror will be straight.

. If your mirror is too large to hold up easily and mark at the same time, measure it with some measuring tape or a yardstick, and see how those dimensions fit.

4. Measure where your hangers should go on the wall. Your mirror should already have something on the back that it can hang with, either a wire or D-rings. In both cases, you should be sure to mark where the hanger will go, not the screw. You won’t be hanging your mirror from the screw.

. If you have a hanger wire, probably only on a smaller mirror, you will only need one hole. Measure the width of your mirror, and mark a point in the middle of that line. Take the wire in your picture, and hold it taut from the center to measure the distance from the top of wire to the frame. Then, transfer that measurement to your markings on the wall so you know where to put the hanger.

. If you have D-rings, they will be fastened to the mirror, and not move. Measure how far apart your fasteners are from one another, and how far they are from the top of the mirror. Once you have these distances, transfer them to the wall by measuring and marking from your earlier pencil line.

5. Drill your hangers into the wall. If your screw is into a stud, you should be fine without additional support. If not, you may want to include a wall anchor with your hangers.

6. Put bumpers on the back of your mirror. These are little spots made of rubber or plastic that will help keep the mirror from tilting, and prevent it from leaving marks on the wall. You should be able to find them at a hardware or craft store.

7. Hang your mirror. Line up your rings or wire with the appropriate hook, and hang the mirror. If your mirror is too heavy or large for you to lift easily, get someone else to help. You may also want another person to help look in the back to make sure you are placing the wire or rings in the right place, especially if the mirror is large enough that you can’t see around it while holding it up.

8. Clean off your mirror. Now that it is in place, polish or wipe down the mirror so your surface is clean and reflective. Enjoy its new place on your wall.

Method 2 – Hanging the Mirror With Cleats

1. Make sure your mirror has a sturdy frame. Cleats are screwed into the mirror frame, as well as the wall itself. Your mirror needs to have a strong, thick frame to make sure the screws don’t damage the glass.

2. Weigh your mirror. Most cleats can hold a lot of weight, but you’ll want to check the packaging to be certain. A bathroom scale should be enough to get a good weight.

3. Find a place to hang the mirror. Make sure you have enough space on the wall for the mirror, and otherwise decide how you want it positioned relative to other items on the wall and in the room. Hold your mirror up to the wall to see how much space it will take up. Finding a stud can be useful, but not necessary if you have a strong enough hanger.

. Once you have a good place, mark where the top of your mirror will go with a pencil or some painters tape so you’ll be able to measure for the hangers. You can also use those pencil marks and a level to make sure your mirror will be straight.

. If your mirror is too large to hold up easily and mark at the same time, measure it with some measuring tape or a yardstick, and see how those dimensions fit.

4. Drill your cleats onto the mirror frame. Different cleats can be stronger in different places, but in general, it is best to position the braces at the top and bottom edges of the mirror. You may want to use an awl to start the holes.

. Once you have them in, measure how far apart the cleats are from one another, and from the edges of the mirror.

5. Drill your cleats into the wall. Using your measurements, position the other part of the cleats based on where they need to be to hold the mirror. If your screw is into a stud, you should be fine as is, but if not, you may want to include a wall anchor with your hangers.

. If you are hanging the mirror onto a wall of brick or thick plaster, you’ll need larger screws and a stronger drill bit to get into the wall, and make sure it holds on

6. Hang your mirror. Line up the two sets of cleats, and place your mirror down and into the space to hold it in place. If your mirror is too heavy or large for you to lift easily, get someone else to help. You may also want another person to help look in the back to make sure you are placing the cleats together in the right place.

7. Clean off your mirror. Now that it is in place, polish or wipe down the mirror so your surface is clean and reflective. Enjoy its new place on your wall.

Method 3 – Hanging the Mirror With Adhesive

1. Get a frameless mirror. Adhesives are most common with frameless mirrors, mostly because there is nothing else to put a bracket or screw into. If your mirror has a frame, you’re probably better off using hangers or other tools. Frameless mirrors are most commonly used in bathrooms.

2. Purchase the glue. Make sure you get adhesives specially made for hanging mirrors. It will need to stick to both the mirror glass and your wall. Plus, because frameless mirrors are normally in placed in bathrooms, your glue will also need to withstand the more humid environment.

3. Measure your mirror. A ruler or tape measure should do. This will be important when you think about where the mirror needs to go. It should lay flat against the wall, so there needs to be plenty of space. There cannot be anything between your mirror and the wall if you are using adhesives.

4. Mark the wall where you want your mirror to go. Use the measurements you got before and trace where you think the mirror would look best to make sure it will fit there. You can lightly mark the wall in pencil to see where it will go. You can also use those pencil marks and a level to make sure your mirror will be straight.

. Once your glue dries, you won’t be able to readjust the mirror without damaging your walls (and possibly the mirror), so your measurements need to be exact. You only get one shot at this.

5. Apply adhesive. Follow the instructions on your glue to make sure you use the proper amount, and put it in the right places on either the back of the mirror or the wall. You should only need to apply it to one surface, not both, but check the instructions to be sure.

6. Push the mirror on to the wall. Hold in place according to the instructions on the adhesive so that it dries. It will probably be quickly, but you don’t want to let go until the glue is set. Depending on the size of your mirror, you may want another person to help.

7. Clean off your mirror. Now that it is in place, polish or wipe down the mirror so your surface is clean and reflective. Enjoy its new place on your wall.